Need Help Getting Into Wine? Learn About The Robust And Dry Spanish Red Wine Tempranillo

Saying you like red wine is as basic as saying you like clothes. Points for honesty and not much else.

What kind, from where, made by whom? It’s a lot of minor and major details, to say the least, and it’s not surprising this expectation of a historical deep-dive can turn new drinkers off entirely. More pieces lately have been cropping up concerning this self-imposed barrier in the wine industry, from complicated labeling to stubborn marketing clinging to a very specific demographic. Fortunately for new wine drinkers, the Internet is the great equalizer.

This great guide over on Wine Folly offers up a detailed, yet brisk breakdown of Tempranillo, the Spanish red grape that’s defined the country’s wine scene. It’s a very robust variety that’s sometimes compared to smoke and leather, quite a jump from the fruitier cherry and raspberry notes of some pinot noir varieties. That’s right alongside breakdowns of the grape’s history, cultivation and long-standing appreciation in today’s stores. While I’m looking to buy more merlot, I’m excited to try Tempranillo soon.

Next chance you get to visit the grocery store, consider double-checking your red wine origins for Tempranillo. You might just find a fresh (or rather, dry) favorite.

2 thoughts on “Need Help Getting Into Wine? Learn About The Robust And Dry Spanish Red Wine Tempranillo

  1. Dr B says:

    Variety and trying things out is very lacking in wine, you’re right that the Internet is a leveller though. I was very lucky as a student that a small group of us formed our own wine club and each month tried a different grape and/or a different country or region. Three years of that was invaluable!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s